Boundaries: What are they and why do we need them?

Relationships are a fundamental part of being human. We are wired to connect with each other as a source of both healing and survival. With every relationship, personal or professional, comes the need for boundaries. Boundaries are the invisible lines that keep us physically and emotionally safe while effectively functioning. They govern what we are … Continue reading Boundaries: What are they and why do we need them?

Compassion Fatigue is not just a Social Service Problem

This past month, CNN reported on an Uber internal memo acknowledging that their special investigative unit is beginning to suffer the impact of investigating everything from assaults, threats and other traumatic incidents. In the social service world, we call this “Compassion Fatigue” or secondary traumatic stress. It occurs in high stress occupations that involve exposure … Continue reading Compassion Fatigue is not just a Social Service Problem

Should I Trust My Gut?

I’m not sure who said it first, but I always liked the saying “Never make a permanent decision based on temporary feelings.” This seems like opposite advice to adages like “trust your gut,” or “follow your heart.” I would never suggest ignoring our emotions when it comes to decision making.  I do think it is … Continue reading Should I Trust My Gut?

4 Ways to Practice Flexible Thinking When Problem Solving

While at the beach the other day, I noticed a young boy trying to move his beach umbrella. As he lifted it from the sand, a gust of wind tuned it inside out. He struggled to close it against the wind for some time. Suddenly, he stopped as if an idea had occurred to him. The … Continue reading 4 Ways to Practice Flexible Thinking When Problem Solving

7 Ways to Improve Critical Thinking and Challenge Brain Bias

In a world where we are bombarded with quick bites of information with questionable validity, the need for critical thinking is more important than ever. However, our brain is designed to make quick decisions with a limited amount of information through the processes of assimilation and generalization. This enables us to learn and adapt quicker … Continue reading 7 Ways to Improve Critical Thinking and Challenge Brain Bias

6 Habits of Growth Minded Leaders

Since researcher Carol Dweck introduced us to the concept of the growth mindset, a lot has been said about its role in achieving success for individuals. The same holds true for organizations. Resilient organizations strive to create a culture that encourages growth and learning.  However, organizations are what they do and this is reflected in … Continue reading 6 Habits of Growth Minded Leaders

The Resilient Strategic Plan

3 elements for success Both resilient people and resilient organizations are able to plan strategically for the future. However, most of us have experienced a plan that either is abandoned before it is complete, does not achieve the desired outcome or just fails to inspire anyone to do anything differently. These past failures can make … Continue reading The Resilient Strategic Plan

4 Books That Influenced How I Think About Resiliency

  One of the only things I like about winter is that I feel I have more time to read. This year I have been focusing my reading on the growing body of research that helps us understand how we develop, grow and succeed.  I especially like books that challenge the way I think about … Continue reading 4 Books That Influenced How I Think About Resiliency

Resilient Organizations

Can the way you are thinking be preventing your organization from thriving? Creating a resilient organization often requires a shift in organizational culture. This involves implementing operationalized values that are adhered to at every level and area of the organization. However, deep and lasting change requires more than just writing new policy and implementing new … Continue reading Resilient Organizations

Resilience and the Reenactment Triangle

Can changing the way we think, keep us from being pulled into relationship drama? You might be familiar with the drama triangle (also known as the reenactment triangle) introduced by Dr. Stephen Karpman decades ago. The triangle identifies three roles we take in reenactment (victim, persecutor and rescuer) and is a useful tool for understanding … Continue reading Resilience and the Reenactment Triangle